Drop Off Animals

What should I do if I want to drop off my own animal at the shelter?

We will accept pets at no charge that are dropped off by their owners (called owner surrendered animals).  We feel compelled to explain that due to the volume of animals we receive from the public, animals dropped off by their owners are at risk.  We receive over 6,000 animals each year (an average of about 20 animals per day).  These animals are owner surrendered, trays brought in by the public and strays that the 4 county animal control organizations (Knox, Whitley, McCreary, Clay counties) bring in.  We do our very best to find suitable homes and rescues for every animal we receive but due to the volume, have not yet achieved our goal of saving every animal.

If you know that you are going to bring an animal to the shelter, do not feed it that morning. The animal will be fed when it arrives at the shelter and is at no risk of starving during transport.  More often than not, feeding the animal will cause it to get sick in your vehicle and make an unnecessary mess. When you bring an animal to the shelter, you will be required to sign a contract stating that you understand that you no longer have any rights to the animal and that it therefore becomes the property of the shelter. Once the animal is signed over to us, no information about that animal can be released with the exception of whether or not it is still in our shelter. We do our absolute best to find every animal a home but we are not always successful and under no circumstances will we release whether or not an animal was adopted or euthanized.

What should I do if I want to pick up a stray and bring it to the shelter?

The Knox-Whitley Animal Shelter does not recommend anyone transporting animals that do not belong to them. Animals are very unpredictable and can cause serious injuries to humans, intentionally or unintentionally. If you do decide to transport an animal to the shelter, please use any available precautions and remember that you are dealing with a very scared animal that may believe you are trying to hurt him/her. The shelter has Live Animal Traps available to rent that could help to prevent injuries to you or the animal.

If you know that you are going to bring an animal to the shelter, do not feed it that morning. The animal will be fed when it arrives at the shelter and is at no risk of starving during transport.  More often than not, feeding the animal will cause it to get sick in your vehicle and make an unnecessary mess. When you bring an animal to the shelter, you will be required to sign a contract stating that you understand that you no longer have any rights to the animal and that it therefore becomes the property of the shelter. Once the animal is signed over to us, no information about that animal can be released with the exception of whether or not it is still in our shelter. We do our absolute best to find every animal a home but we are not always successful and under no circumstances will we release whether or not an animal was adopted or euthanized.